A few print images from through the year

This is a collection of some of the print derived digital images that I have produced this year. All are linocuts that have been cut and hand-printed, then scanned and digitally manipulated to produce the colour images. A more traditional approach would be to add colour through separate printed plates, but this process allowed me to move more quickly to the image I was looking to create.

After the harvest
We are blessed to have a number of hares in the fields surrounding our home. In late summer, when the harvest has been cut, they can be clearly seen sitting out in the stubble, warming themselves in the evening sunlight.

After the harvest

Fading away
In one of the glass cases at NHM Tring sits a small brown ball of scales. Originally acquired as part of William Rothschild’s natural history collection over a century ago, the pangolin, for that is what it is, has not faired well in the following 100 years. Of the eight remaining species of pangolin, four are listed as vulnerable, two are listed as endangered and two as critically endangered on the IUCN red list of critically endangered species. It is the only surviving mammal to have developed scales and because of this is now the most heavily trafficked animal in the world.

Fading away

We were here all along 1 & 2
In July 2016, through some fortuitous events, we discovered a long established colony of glow worms in a set a side field. For three weeks we visited nightly, photographing and counting them. This digital image, derived from an original linocut, is the result. You can read the full story of the glow-worms here.

We were here all along 1

Lanyon Quoit
The Quoit is a neolithic dolmen or chambered tomb, located in Cornwall, 2 miles south east of Morvah, near Penzance. It collapsed in a storm in 1815 and was re-erected nearly a decade later and therefore unlikely to be true to its original appearance. It is though a powerful and evocative site, sitting as it has in the boggy fields towards the south western tip of these isles for over four thousand years.

Lanyon Quoit

Albion
In the turbulent EU referendum campaigning of the early part of the year I produced this piece, representing the Britain I thought I knew that had welcomed refugees and migrants over the centuries. Albion, the giant of Britain’s mythical beginnings, stands in welcome on Dover’s white cliffs.

Albion

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